World

Catalan cloud over Spain’s big day

Spanish Guardia Civil honor troops march during the Spanish National Day military parade in Madrid yesterday. The day was overshadowed by a push for independence for Catalonia. — AFP

Spanish Guardia Civil honor troops march during the Spanish National Day military parade in Madrid yesterday. The day was overshadowed by a push for independence for Catalonia. — AFP

SPAIN celebrated its national day yesterday with a show of unity in the face of Catalan independence efforts, a day after the central government gave the region’s separatist leader a deadline to abandon his secession bid.

The country is suffering its worst political crisis in a generation after separatists in the wealthy northeastern region voted in a banned referendum on October 1 to split from Spain.

To mark the national holiday, Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy and King Felipe VI attended a traditional military parade in central Madrid.

Armed forces marched along Madrid’s Paseo de la Castellana boulevard to commemorate the day that Christopher Columbus first arrived in the Americas in 1492.

Separate pro-unity rallies, including one by members of a far-right movement, were organized in the Catalan capital Barcelona.

In Madrid, cheering crowds lined the streets, waving red and yellow Spanish flags and some crying “Viva Espana!” as air force jets and helicopters flew overhead.

“I love to see people waving our national flag,” said Beatriz Trapero, who was watching with her husband. “There used to be a certain shyness in showing it but now it seems not so much.”

Rajoy has vowed to do everything in his power to prevent Catalan secession. His government says it is ready to take control of the region after Catalan president Carles Puigdemont’s announcement Tuesday that he accepted a mandate for “Catalonia to become an independent state.” But he quickly asked regional lawmakers to suspend it to allow for dialogue with Madrid.

Rajoy responded that Puigdemont had until Monday to decide if he planned to push ahead with secession and then until Thursday to reconsider, otherwise Madrid would trigger constitutional steps that could suspend Catalonia’s regional autonomy.

World leaders are watching closely, and uncertainty over the fate of the region of 7.5 million people has damaged business confidence, with several listed firms already moving their legal headquarters out of Catalonia.

The region itself is deeply divided, with polls suggesting Catalans are roughly evenly split on whether to go it alone.

While Puigdemont insists the October 1 referendum gave him a mandate for independence and has said he still wants dialogue with Madrid, Rajoy has rejected calls for mediation and refuses to negotiate on anything until the separatists abandon their independence drive.

“It is not peaceful, it is not free, it will not be recognized by Europe and now everyone knows it will have costs,” he told lawmakers.

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